Food, Health

Day 2.

My Jawbone UP still hasn’t arrived from amazon. I am slightly annoyed by that, but tracking says it will be here today.

Yesterday was my first day of the Isagenix cleanse.  I will say that the shakes are…mediocre. They remind me of appetite suppression/fad diet shakes my mother used to make in the 80s. The difference being about 20 years of nutritional innovation. The ingredient list, while quite long, only has one scary word: isomaltooligosaccharide. IMO is a prebiotoc starch. There are  worse things that could be on a “powdered drink” ingredient list. I will deal.

I had the option to choose a diary free box or the whey protein box when I ordered. While I don’t do dairy on the regular (and hate milk), I know my body works well with wey protein so I went with that option. meh… it tastes very “milky” to me, which is probably why I find it to be mediocre instead of great. If you don’t have an aversion to milk, you’d probably love it.  I was worried yesterday about being hungry, being jittery or being miserable. I am happy to report no jitters, hungry only just before dinner (I’ll call that intuitive eating 😉 ).  The only miserable effect was/is my caffeine withdrawal headache, which was to be expected. Every time I do a detox, whether it’s whole foods/macrobiotic based or a juice cleanse, the damn coffee headache gets me every time.

Hubby is doing his best to be supportive, which I need and appreciate. We had a nice dinner last night – grilled chicken, asparagus, portobello mushrooms, cherry tomatoes and peppers. It was totally delish. I sorry I didn’t take a picture!

This morning my headache was slight and dull. Definitely not as extreme as last night.  I blended my am shake with a 1/2 a banana and I found that to take away a good amount of the “milk” flavor.  Technically I don’t think I am supposed to, but it’s not a “cleanse” day and it’s only 50 calories, so THIS health coach thinks it’s fine.  There was a change in my weight from yesterday morning to this morning, but I am only going to count the weekly change.  My weight yoyos 4-5 lbs on a daily basis on the regular, so a daily weigh in won’t work for me.  Energy-wise I feel good.  We’ll see what the rest of the week brings. I am supposed to get my period, that could lead to disaster.

 

Food

Chicken and Spinach Stuffed Shells

I love to cook. But I almost never cook for my Hubby.  He’s a little on the picky side, a little on the carnivorous side and I am a little on the health nut, veggie lover side.  It’s so uber challenging living with someone that doesn’t have the same palate as you. What was he thinking marrying a nice German girl who loves her some sauerkraut, pickles and mustard (not necessarily at the same time) when he runs screaming from any of them! I love experimenting with fermenting foods and he’s terrified of it.  Seriously though, who hates pickles and mustard? They are two of my FAVORITE FOODS!

I have a few go-to comfort foods that I cook (neither extraordinarily healthy nor vegan) for him every so often. His favorite being my chicken and spinach stuffed shells.  I cooked them the other night and posted a picture to facebook. I had quite a few people ask me for the recipe.  The trouble is, I almost never cook with recipe (unless I am baking).  I feel my way through from the 14 years of experience I had waiting tables and from growing up watching the women in my life cook and my obsession with the food network.  Now I am going to feel my way through writing a recipe for my stuffed shells!

One thing I know is weird about my stuffed shell recipe is that I don’t use milk or egg in the filling. I personally don’t think it needs it.  You’ll also know that I haven’t really added quantities…umm I don’t pay attention to that stuff. I measure by sight and handfuls.

Ingredients:

  •  Shells – the big ones (2/3 of a box will fill a 9×13 pan and will feed 2 people about 3-4 times).
  • Organic chicken breast (2-3)
  • Part skim ricotta cheese
  • Part skim shredded mozzarella
  • Fresh baby spinach
  • Your favorite (or homemade) tomato sauce
  • Garlic
  • Your favorite Italian herbs and spices: salt, pepper, oregano, basil, parsley
Chicken & Spinach Stuffed Shells

Pre-Game + Game Time

  • Bring a large pot of water (for the shells) to a boil (add EVOO + salt) – cook to aldente  (not to squishy or they will get super soggy and mushy when you bake them) I rinse with cold water and set aside.  Most chef’s say not to do this.
  • slice or cube (raw) chicken
  • Rinse the fresh spinach. (2-3 over flowing fist-fulls)
  • Saute the chicken with a little EVOO and lots of garlic (fresh, minced) add salt, pepper, and any dried herbs you like to taste.  Set aside when cooked through.
  • Saute spinach until wilted in a little EVOO and garlic – add salt + pepper to taste.
  • In a large bowl, mix ricotta (medium sized container) warm spinach and 1/2 a bag of shredded mozzarella. Add salt, pepper, your favorite herbs to taste.
  • In a large (9×13) glass pan, dump about half a jar of the sauce – spread around.
  • begin stuffing shells with the spinach-ricotta mixture – I use my hands. It’s easier. They’re slippery little suckers.
  • Line the shells in the sauced pan in an orderly fashion!
  • Sneak in the sauteed chicken in between the shells.
  • Top with the rest of the jar of sauce.
  • Cover with mozzarella cheese to taste. (some like more, some like lots)
  • Add some fresh herbs to the top (last time around i just used parsley)
  • Bake at 350 for about 35 minutes until bubbley and melty.

ENJOY!

Food, Health

Eating for Fertility: Part II

In Eating for Fertility Part I, I explored the connection between aphrodisiacs and fertility. Now lets really dig into fertility health. What you put in your mouth before conception is just as important as after! Preconception health awareness should start 6 months to one year before conception. And this should include both parents. That’s right guys, you have responsibility in fertility health too! As many as one in six couples will experience fertility problems within the first year trying to conceive. However, the odds of conception can be increased by making a few nutritional and lifestyle changes.

There are two basic tenants of fertility health: the removal of toxins and the infusion of nutrients. Environmental toxins include additives and preservatives in our food, toxins in household cleaning products as well as the products we use to clean our bodies and guilty pleasures such as alcohol, tobacco and caffeine.

The good news is that simple changes in your diet can boost your fertility and bring your body into top baby making shape. Diets of both men and women trying to conceive (TTC) should be high in folic acid, vitamin D, vitamin E and zinc. It’s also very important both parents eat clean, organic foods free from pesticides, fungicides, additives and preservatives. Men and women eating for fertility should incorporate the following foods into their diet:

Whole Grains – whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa, and oats are good for insulin function. Refined grains (bleached white rice, flour and pasta) should be avoided as they cause insulin spikes which can affect estrogen levels.

Dark Leafy Greens – greens such as spinach, kale, swiss chard and conifers such as broccoli, cauliflower and rabe are high in folate which is important for conception and fetal development.

Protein – vegetarian protein from sources like beans, peas, legumes and nuts are high in iron and preferred to animal protein. You don’t need to become a vegetarian, but meat should be limited to small occasional portions.

Good Fats– omit trans fats and saturated fats from your diet, but include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids. These will reduce inflammation and any insulin sensitivity. They can be found in avocados, nuts, chia seeds and salmon.

Organic Produce – fresh organic fruits and vegetables are packed with antioxidants that will promote general and fertility health. Many fruits such as citrus, oranges, strawberries (and green leafy vegetables) are high in folate.

Ok, so for the average healthy conscious person the above list seems pretty much like a no brainer, right? Yeah, that’s a great first step. Taking a conscious approach to fertility simply by adjusting your diet and lifestyle will increase your chances of conception. Removing environmental toxins, and making positive, organic food choices has been shown to increase the chances of having a healthy, happy, comfortable pregnancy, a positive and safe birth with little or no intervention, a shorter postpartum recovery period and a baby who is healthy and present.

So what else? There’s got to be more, right? You guessed it, Super foods! That’s what else! If you’re not sure what super foods are, you can catch up with an awesome post by my pal, Lauren here. If you want the cliffs notes, super foods are nutrient dense foods that have an abundance of minerals, vitamins and antioxidants. In Eating for Fertility III, I’ll dig into super foods and fertility. Super foods for super baby making! Stay tuned!

Food, Health

All I want is Food and Creative Love

 Eating for Fertility Part I

in celebration of National Pregnancy Month!

Pardon the Rusted Root reference (all I want is food and creative love) but considering food and love have been bedfellows for centuries, I thought it was appropriate. Food and love, sounds like a fresh new relationship, doesn’t it? You know, the blissful ones, sharing chocolate cake, gazing at each other with honeymoon eyes.

So, say you’re past the honeymoon eyes phase and onto the seed germination phase….conception…baby making. Does one have to do with the other? Does it even matter what passes your lips? You betcha it does!!

What you eat BEFORE you get pregnant is important!

Hundreds of years ago, before people really knew what vitamins, minerals and nutrients were all about, people attributed qualities such as shape (ie: foods in the shape of sexual organs such as oysters and figs) or the food’s ability to make your temperature rise (e.g. chili peppers or curry) to increased potency or fertility.(P.S. That’s a picture of a fresh fig, one of my favorite fruits!) Aphrodisiacs aside, diet really can affect your ability to conceive. Positively and negatively. And believe it or not, there’s actually a bit more to aphrodisiacs than the shape and temperature of the food!!

Overly strict dieting and excessive exercise that results in extreme weight loss may result in loss of ovulation. On the other spectrum, too much eating resulting in obesity may also inhibit fertility. The diet of both men and women trying to conceive should be well balanced, consisting of whole foods rich in folic acid, Vitamin D, Vitamin E and Zinc. There are simple changes you can make to your diet to boost your fertility and bring your body into optimum baby making shape.The fun part is the food and creative love….aphrodisiacs!After conducting a little research on traditional aphrodisiacs and their nutritional content I found the correlation between tradition aphrodisiacs and preconception health to be uncanny! The ancient ones who ate whole foods rather than processed, chemicalized foods always got it right. Just check out a of the aphrodisiacs on the list below:Avacado: The Aztecs called the avocado tree “ahuacuatl,” which means “testicle tree” (avacados hang in pairs on the tree). Avacados provide nearly 20 essential nutrients, including fiber, potassium, Vitamin E, B-vitamins and folic acid, all of which are essential for preconception health!

Banana Flower

Bananas: Do I really have to articulate why a banana is an aphrodisiac? Besides the banana flower’s amazing phallic shape, bananas are rich in potassium and B vitamins, necessities for sex hormone production. Bananas also provide 452 milligrams of potassium, 33 milligrams of magnesium, and just over 2 grams of fiber. They are high in potassium and a respectable amount of magnesium as well.

Chocolate: See, there really IS a God and the Aztec’s called chocolate the “nourishment of the Gods.” Not only is chocolate a superfood, it contains more antioxidants than red wine! So if you really want more bang for your buck, try sharing a glass of Cabernet with a small piece of dark chocolate.

Oysters: have been linked with love and sexuality for hundreds of years. The ancient law of similarities reasons that their similarity to female genitalia dictates they may in fact possess sexual powers!! Similarities aside, oysters are full of vitamins and minerals like A, B1, B2 ,C and D, calcium, iodine, iron, potassium, copper, sodium, zinc, phosphorous, manganese and sulphur and the all-important omega-3 fatty acids.

Pineapple: has been traditionally used as a homeopathic treatment for impotence. It’s an excellent source of the trace mineral manganese, vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B1, copper, dietary fiber and vitamin B6.

Other aphrodisiacs include almond, arugula, asparagus, basil, broccoli rabe, carrots, fennel, figs, garlic, ginger, honey, licorice, mustard, nutmeg, pine nuts, raspberries, strawberries, truffles, vanilla, and wine.

In Part II of Food and Creative Love: Eating for Fertility and I will provide a few recipes to boost your fertility while tickling your taste buds! When I first researched and wrote this blog entry, I had so fun doing the research and learning about it that I turned it into a workshop.  One of the most awesome things ever, is that a 41 year old woman that attended this workshop (last fall) is now pregnant and due in October!

Food, Health

Getting Your Body Ready

Last week I told you guys the month of May is National Pregnancy Awareness Month. Since I am fully aware that I am NOT in fact pregnant. I thought I would dust off some Sprouting Wellness tips and talk about getting pregnant.  It’s funny, as women we tend to spend the majority of our early adult lives trying our hardest not to get pregnant, then somewhere around our late 20s to early, mid or late 30s we realize we do in fact want to get pregnant.  We try like hell and realize, it’s not so friggin easy!

While each path to conception may be different one thing everyone can do is take proactive steps to get their body ready for conception. Many parent’s to be think caring for baby begins at conception; once you see the little blue line, or the pink plus on the stick, it’s time to quit smoking, stop drinking and start buying organic. The truth is, prenatal health begins with preconception and fertility health.

Another important (often unrealized) fact to remember: it takes two to tango.  Even in the world of artificial insemination, it still takes two to tango.  And what I mean by this is, the health responsibility doesn’t solely fall on us women folk! Our men need to get healthy too. You don’t want their little swimmers crapping out before they reach the finish line, right?!

The ability to get pregnant, carry a child, fetal development, give birth naturally and breastfeed are all intertwined. Each is dependent upon lifestyle choices, diet, stress and yes, our environment. As many as one in six couples will experience fertility problems within the first year to trying to conceive, however, you can increase your odds of conception by making a few nutritional and lifestyle changes.

Fertility and preconception health awareness should begin with both parents, ideally six months to one year prior to conception. This starts with two basic tenants; the removal of toxins and the infusion of nutrients. Both male and female reproductive organs are highly susceptible to free radical or oxidative damage from environmental toxins. Environmental toxins include additives and preservatives in our food, toxics in household cleaning products as well as the products we use to clean our bodies and guilty pleasures such as alcohol, tobacco and caffeine.

Simple changes in our diet will boost your fertility and bring your body into top baby making shape. The diet of both men and women trying to conceive should be high in folic acid, vitamin D, Vitamin E and Zinc. It’s imperative that both parents eat clean, organic foods free from pesticides, fungicides, additives and preservatives.

Men and women eating for fertility should incorporate the following foods into their diet:

Whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa, oatmeal are good for insulin function. Refined grains (bleached flour, rice and pasta) should be omitted as they cause insulin spikes.

Dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale, swiss chard and conifers such as broccoli, cauliflower and rabe are high in folate, which is important for conception and fetal development.

Protein. Vegetarian protein from sources like beans, peas, legumes and nuts are high in iron and preferred to animal proteins. You don’t need to become a vegetarian, but meat should be limited to small occasional portions.

The right fats. Omit trans fats and saturated fats from your diet, but include monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids. These will reduce inflammation and any insulin sensitivity. The can be found in avocados, nuts, chia seeds and salmon.

Fresh organic fruits and vegetables are packed with antioxidants that will promote general, and fertility health. Many fruits such as citrus, oranges, strawberries (and green leafy vegetables) are high in folate.

Taking a conscious approach to fertility simply by adjusting your diet and lifestyle will increase your chances of conception. Removing environmental toxins and making positive, organic food choices has been shown to increase the chances of having a healthy, happy and comfortable pregnancy, a positive, safe birth with little or no intervention, a shorter postpartum recovery period and a baby who is healthy and present.

Food

Fashionably late to the WIAW blog party….

You would think someone so obsessed with taking pictures of her food (have you seen my FB mobile uploads???) would know about a blog party that features what you eat. I don’t know why I wasn’t invited earlier! hahaha Actually, I stumbled upon the WIAW blog party from my friend Rebecca at Blueberry Smiles (I’ve been drooling over her WIAW posts forever).  Call me blonde, but it took me a bit to figure the whole concept out. Now I got it, so here I go 🙂

Breakfast. I miss my leisurely pre 9-5 job breakfasts. Now my breakfasts don’t have as much pizzazz. It’s either raw, sauteed and wrapped or it goes in the blender. Doesn’t get much easier than scrambled eggs and kale. Even though I sat down at the table to eat it (rather than stuffing it in a wrap and eating on my commute) I still made it to work on time!

Breakfast: scrambled eggs, tomatoes, sauteed kale and avocado.

Juicy Snack: I juiced these the night before so I could have a pick me up at 10:30am and then again at 2:30pm. The last thing I want to do is cave to the 9-5 coffee and vending machine addiction. I beat that years ago! Just because I’m workin like Dolly doesn’t mean I’m going to fall back into bad habits! It’s my version of snacking now & laters.

Green Juice: kale, cucumber, lemon, apple & ginger

Lunch: I love crunchy, fruity, tangy salads!! Yes, I bought it. Don’t hate me for not packing my lunch for work. Greens get wilty and sad in the office. This arugula was zesty, crisp and absolutely AMAZEBALLS!

Asian peanut salad

Dinner: This is one of my favorite, meals that the Hubs makes. It’s SO easy. 1. Chop up delicious fresh organic veggies.  2. Stuff delicious veggies in little home-made aluminum foil pouches. 3. add a 1/2 teaspoon coconut oil to delicious veggies. 4. add your favorite spices (today it was curry and turmeric) to delicious veggies. 4. seal your little aluminum foil pouch. 5. bake in the oven at about 375 until steamy and delicious! (I like my veggies on the crunchy side so I only baked them for 12-15 minutes. If you like yours softer go for more).

Baked curry veggies

Wine was also for dinner…but I couldnt manage my cell phone and glass well enough to take the picture 🙂

Dessert: sweet tooth be damned!!!

sooooooooooo delicious

Yup that’s WIA!

Food

What is going Raw?

Raw Spring Rolls: Zucchini, lettuce, carrots, red bell peppers and jicama.

Sure, you might feel like you’re being healthy when you order a nutritious salad (meaning: not a pile of iceberg lettuce saturated in creamy, fatty dressing, but actually vegetables), but would you want to commit to eating all raw food, all the time? The raw food movement, sometimes called the Live Food movement, is focused on eating only raw and unprocessed foods, often organically grown. Although many are only familiar with the vegan version of this movement, there are vegetarians (lacto-ovo and others), as well as omnivores who participate. A smaller component of the movement actually promotes a carnivorous (only animal product) diet. Similarly, fruitarians- those who try to only eat fruit- are a part of the raw food movement.

One of the main tenets of the belief that raw food is better lies in the loss of nutrients through cooking or processing food. While this is certainly true to a very large degree, it does not hold across the board. A more holistic approach might be to look at each food individually to determine whether it should be eaten raw, slightly cooked, or thoroughly cooked. As with most things in life, knowledge is power.

For some foods, scientists have discovered that light steaming actually makes nutrients available in food that the body would not otherwise be able to digest- broccoli is one such food. If the focus is truly bio-availability, then knowing that the nutrients in spinach are most readily absorbed by the body when it is lightly steamed and eaten with vinegar makes it hard to argue for eating spinach raw. With both of these foods, overcooking leads to a loss of nutrients, so attention paid to each individual food will allow you to gain the most nutrients from them. Likewise, freezing blueberries unlocks many of their antioxidant properties – increasing their health benefits, which is what exploring healthy diets is all about.

So, is raw right for everyone? Probably not. Is raw right for you? Maybe….you never really know until you try it. What it all boils down to is bioindividuality. What works wonders for one person may not for the next. You simply have to experiment to find out.
Food

Growing Your Own Sprouts….

Bean Sprouts in Ball jars!

Bean Sprouts. I love them. While they’re mostly used in Asian cuisine, given their nutritional value I would like to advocate for their consumption in all cuisines including homemade soups and salads. Mung Bean Sprouts are power packed with pure forms of vitamins A, B, C, and E, in addition to an assortment of minerals including Calcium, Iron, and Potassium. One cup of mung bean sprouts contains only approximately 30 calories, 3 grams of protein, only 6 carbohydrates, and only .2 grams of fat. Sprouts also contain a high source of fiber, are easily digestible and contain a high concentration of enzymes facilitating the digestive process. Mung bean sprouts have a delightful crunch and mild flavor, which makes for an enjoyable snack experience, and are a welcome addition to many meals as an accompaniment or ingredient. While mung bean sprouts are available year round in the grocery store, it’s less expensive to grow them yourself!!

Growing sprouts in a jar
The easiest method is to grow sprouts in a glass canning jar. I have a collection of antique blue ball mason jars that I like to use. Any size jar will do. Sprouts need fresh air, cover the top of the jar with muslin, cheese cloth or nylon mesh screen and secure with a rubber band.

Step One: Soaking
For a quart-sized jar, put 1 ½ to 2 tablespoons of small seeds (up to 1 cup if using larger seeds like green peas or garbanzo) in the sprouting jar. Cover top of jar with cloth or sprouting lid and rinse the seeds in warm (not hot) water. Drain and refill so that water is about an inch above the seeds. Let the seeds soak 8-12 hours (overnight). Protect from light by covering with a dish towel or placing in a cupboard.

Step Two: Rinsing
Rinse 2 to 3 times per day for 2 to 3 days. After thoroughly draining the rinse water, lay the jar on its side to spread out the seeds. Do not expose to light. After 2 to 3 days the sprouts should be filling up the jar.
Step Three: Removing Hulls
After 2 to 3 days the sprouts will have thrown off their hulls. To remove the hulls, place the sprouts in a bowl and run cool water over them. Most of the hulls will either float to the top or sink to the bottom making them easy to remove. (Note: not all seeds have hulls.)

Step Four: Harvesting
Rinse sprouts in cool water and remove any remaining hulls. Drain in a colander but do not allow the sprouts to dry out. Place in an air-tight bag leaving room for air circulation. If your sprouts need to develop chlorophyll or carotene there is one final step. (The seed package directions should tell you whether greening is necessary.)

Step Five: Greening
Once the hulls are removed, place the sprouts back into the sprouting jar or into a clear plastic airtight bag. Put the sprouts in indirect sunlight. It takes about a day for the chlorophyll and carotenes to develop. Once the sprouts are ready rinse, drain, and eat, or refrigerate.
Storing:
Sprouts will keep for about a week in the refrigerator if you rinse them once every day or two. Be sure to keep the sprouts from freezing as they are frost sensitive.
Seeds are easy to store. Put them an a glass jar with an air-tight lid and keep them in a cool, dark storage area. They will keep for a year or more. Now get to sprouting!
Food, Health

Jersey Peaches and Eco-Skin Care

I feel a little bad about ripping on Jersey’s lack of peaks in my Touching the Button post so I decided to give Jersey a little credit where it’s due. I am after all, a Jersey Girl(right now).

Jersey Fresh Peaches

One of the most amazing things about living in the Garden State is the bountiful produce to be found here! Beginning in May, farmers markets and road side stands start to burst with life and the bounty of the first crops. Until you’ve lived outside the Garden State, you don’t realize how lucky you actually are!

New Jersey has more than 9,500 farms state wide on more than 725,000 acres. In addition to corn, tomatoes, soybeans and other vegetables, New Jersey produces five major fruit berry crops including apples, blueberries, cranberries, strawberries and peaches.

New Jersey ranks 4th in the nation for peach production. So why buy a Georgia peach when you can get a Jersey peach right in your own back yard?! Gloucester County alone grew 36 million pounds of Peaches in 2007. Peaches come into season in Jersey July through September. They sweeten the air in the farmers market with their delicate sent luring customers in for their first bite of summer. By the time mid-August rolls around you will be able to find delicious and ripe Jersey grown peaches every farmers market in the state.

Peaches are more than just a summertime treat, they’re a guilt free dessert that pack a nutritional wallop! Peaches are rich in Vitamin A which has been shown to prevent cancer. Research even suggests that peaches have good to excellent antioxidant activity, some antimicrobial activity and good to excellent tumor growth inhibition activity. Since Apples officially don’t come into season until September, fill your summers up with a peach a day to keep the doctor away! They are comprised of more than 80 percent water and are a good source of dietary fiber, making them good for people trying to lose weight. Peaches will also help with that healthy summer glow. They’re packed with antioxidants that help make the skin healthy and also add color to the complexion.

To enhance your peaches and cream complexion after a long day relaxing at the shore, try my  Peach & Strawberry Facial Mask: 

Ingredients
1 ripe Jersey Peach
2 ripe Jersey Strawberries
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp oatmeal

Pit and dice the peach. Then mash the peach and strawberries to a creamy pulp. Add a tablespoon of honey and a tablespoon of oatmeal. If the mixture is a bit too thick, add a few drops of water to form a thin paste. Apply to skin and let it sit for 10 minutes. Rinse well with cool water.

Peach peels exfoliate gently and contain large amounts of alpha-hydroxy acids. The natural exfoliation removes dead skin cells and speeds up cell renewal, leading to healthier skin tone. It softens wrinkles, sun spots, age spots, blemishes and unclogs pores leading to a healthier and brighter skin tone. Oatmeal is hypoallergenic and it helps to soften skin. Clinical studies have shown that oatmeal healps to heal dry, itchy skin. This mask will calm your skin and leave you with a beautiful, hydrated glow.

If you want to double the recipe you could put half on your beautiful face and eat the other half for breakfast! Now that’s a cosmetic that I want to use. Nothing unnatural, nothing toxic and everything earth friendly!

There you go, pretty!